Guide to the Records of Weiskopf & Pickworth Consulting Engineers
1901-1971, 1998
(Bulk 1901-1936)
Accession Number # 2001.01


The Skyscraper Museum
39 Battery Place
New York, NY 10280

Phone: (212) 968-1961
URL: http://www.skyscraper.org

© 2002 The Skyscraper Museum. All rights reserved.
The Skyscraper Museum, Publisher

Machine-readable finding aid created by Brian Stevens, 2002. Description is in English.

Descriptive Summary

Creator: Weiskopf & Pickworth Consulting Engineers
Title: The Records of Weiskopf & Pickworth Consulting Engineers
Dates: 1901-1971, 1998
Abstract: Weiskopf & Pickworth Consulting Engineers were a successful partnership of Samuel Weiskopf and John Pickworth founded in 1920. Among many accomplishments, the firm was responsible for the first concrete dome in the United States constructed for the Hayden Planetarium in New York's American Museum of Natural History in 1932. In 1933, Pickworth and Walter Weiskopf were granted a patent for the WP girder (also known as T-flange girder) which reduced the depth of a girder by up to one foot. This collection documents the history of this firm which includes: photographs, patents, drawings, blueprints, press releases, manuscripts, correspondence, pamphlets, and news clippings.
Quantity: ca. 5 linear ft. (6 boxes and 12 framed items)
Identification: The Skyscraper Museum Archive
Location: The Skyscraper Museum Archive

Historical/Biographical Note:

Samuel C. Weiskopf founded his firm in New York in 1898, leaving his post as engineer at Carnegie Steel in order to advance the state of steel design by working with both client and architect. He worked in close collaboration with distinguished architects including Francis H. Kimball and Trowbridge & Livingston on projects such as The Trinity Building, the Bankers Trust Company Building, and the Knickerbocker Hotel. In 1916 John W. Pickworth was hired by Weiskopf to be assistant engineer. Pickworth had previously worked with Post & McCord steel contractors as a draftsman. In 1920 Pickworth became Weiskopf's partner, and the firm name was changed to Weiskopf & Pickworth Consulting Engineers. Although the firm's practice remained active in New York City, Weiskopf & Pickworth was commissioned by Mitsui Bank in Japan, as well as by cities and towns across the United States. From 1913 to 1929, the firm engineered 55 banks in locations from Bangor, Maine to Oshkosh, Wisconsin. In 1930 Samuel Weiskopf retired to be replaced by his 27-year-old son, Walter.

During the Great Depression the firm developed two significant innovations. In 1932 the first concrete dome in the United States was constructed for the Hayden Planetarium in New York's American Museum of Natural History. Weiskopf & Pickworth conducted extensive studies on reinforced concrete to engineer the thin concrete shell dome. In 1933 John Pickworth and Walter Weiskopf were granted a patent for the WP girder (also known as T-flange girder). The invention of the WP girder reduced the depth of a girder by up to one foot, and it was used in projects requiring extremely heavy girders with long spans.

In 1946, two years after his return from his leave to serve as head engineer for the New York District of the Army of Corps of Engineers, Walter Weiskopf hired Anthony Nassetta whom he worked with in the Army Corps. In 1948, Anthony Grasso and Morton Eligator joined the firm, followed by Emanuel Pisetzner in 1953. These four men took on increasing responsibility during the postwar era, and shaped the firm for the next 40 years. In 1952, restrictions placed on building materials due to the Korean War prompted the firm's invention of the first long span precast concrete girders replacing the need for long span steel girders. The 1950s also saw the growth in collaboration between the firm and Gordon Bunshaft of Skidmore, Owings & Merrill. Embracing modernism, they built the Lever House, a glass and steel tower that is credited with bringing International Style architecture to the United States. The publicity of the Lever House generated a public relations boost, and the two firms continued their collaboration on many other projects, including One Chase Manhattan Plaza, the Union Carbide Headquarters and the Equitable Life Assurance Society Home Office Building. In 1960, Anthony Nassetta, Anthony Grasso, Morton Eligator and Emanuel Pisetzner were made Partners.

The 1960s saw the growing working relationship between Weiskopf & Pickworth and I.M. Pei & Associates and the shift in favor by architects from glass and steel structures to concrete structures. The two firms collaborated on the American Life Insurance Company Building in Wilmington, Delaware; L'Enfant Plaza in Washington, DC and the Christian Science Church Center in Boston, Massachusetts. Their relationship will continue into the next several decades with the building of the Canadian Imperial Bank of Commerce Headquarters (1973), the East Wing of the National Gallery of Art in Washington, DC (1978), and Raffles City (1979-1986).

Between 1985 and 1990 Nassetta, Grasso and Eligator retired. Louis Occhicone and Sing Chu were made Senior Associate Partners in 1985, and full Partners in 1990. Pisetzner, the last of the four partners who represented the firm for forty years, retired in 1993. In 1992 the firm entered into partnership with Oscar Faber, an international, multi-disciplinary engineering firm based in the United Kingdom. The merger proved difficult, however, and the partnership dissolved in 1995. Under the new leadership of Occhicone and Chu, close collaboration with the Pei firm (now Pei Cobb Freed & Partners) continued and they engineered The United States Holocaust Memorial Museum (1987-1993) and the Ronald Reagan Building and International Trade Center (1990-1997).

Sources:

[Abstracted from A Century of Engineering for Architecture: Weiskopf & Pickworth Consulting Engineers, 1898-1998 by Erin Gehan. New York, NY: Weiskopf & Pickworth LLP, c1998.]


Scope and Content Note

Collection includes photographs, patents, standards, drawings, blueprints, blackline prints, press releases, reprints, manuscripts, advertisements, correspondence, pamphlets, and clippings from 1901-1971 and 1998 relating to Weiskopf & Pickworth's various projects and their research on girders and resultant patents received. The bulk of the photographs document building process, and the bulk of standards and drawings document Weiskopf & Pickworth's research and writings on T-flange girders. Photographs documenting the building process include the Adams Express Building, Bankers Trust Building, City Investing Building, and Chase Manhattan Building.

The volume of Bankers Trust Building construction photographs, in Series I: Box 5, Folder 2, were described in detail at item-level and can be found at the end of the finding aid. NB: The physical condition of the collection is generally good unless otherwise noted.


Organization

Organized into six series: I. Projects: A-Z, 1901-1971; II. Projects: General, 1902-1904, 1954-1956; III. Patents, 1932-1936; IV. Writings, 1931-1969; V. Printed Materials, 1932-1971; and VI. Framed Photographs and Drawings.


Arrangement

Series I and VI are arranged alphabetically. Series II through V are arranged chronologically.


Restrictions

Access Restrictions

Open to researchers.

Use Restrictions

There may be some restrictions on the use of the collection. Appointments are necessary for use of manuscript and archival materials. For more information, contact
The Skyscraper Museum
55 Broad Street, 13 floor
New York, NY 10004


Access Points

Subject Names:
Nassetta, Anthony F., 1921-
Occhicone, Louis A., 1946-
Pickworth, John W., 1894-1964
Stoller, Ezra
Weiskopf, Samuel C., 1860-1936
Weiskopf, Walter H., 1899-1958
Subject Organizations:
Bell Studios (Firm)
Bethlehem Steel Corporation
Skidmore, Owings & Merrill
Weiskopf & Pickworth Consulting Engineers
Subject Topics:
14 Wall Street (New York, N.Y.)
54 William Street (New York, N.Y.)
68 William Street (New York, N.Y.)
Adams Express Company Building (New York, N.Y.)
Bank buildings-New York (State)-New York
Bankers Trust Company Building (New York, N.Y.)-See 14 Wall Street (New York, N.Y.)
Buildings-New York (State)-New York
City Investing Company Building (New York, N.Y.)
Commercial buildings
Consulting engineers
Equitable Life Assurance Society of the United States Building (New York, N.Y.)
Lever House (New York, N.Y.)
Office buildings-New York (State)-New York
One Chase Manhattan Plaza (New York, N.Y.)
One Liberty Plaza (New York, N.Y.)
Plate girders
Union Carbide and Carbon Corporation Building (New York, N.Y.)
Wall Street (New York, N.Y.)
Subject Places:
New York (State)--New York
Document Types:
Advertisements
Blackline prints
Blueprints
Clippings
Correspondence
Manuscripts for publication
Pamphlets
Patents
Photographs
Press releases
Reprints
Standards
Technical drawings


Related Material at the The Skyscraper Museum

Additional photographs of the Bankers Trust Building can be found in the Bankers Trust Company Building Photograph Collection.


Separated Material

[There is no record of information about materials that are associated by provenance to the described materials but physically separated or removed.]


Administrative Information

Provenance

Donated by Louis A. Occhicone of Weiskopf & Pickworth in 2001.

Preferred Citation

Published citations should take the following form:

Identification of item, date (if known); The Records of Weiskopf & Pickworth Consulting Engineers; Accession Number # 2001.01; box number; folder number; The Skyscraper Museum .


Container List

[The following section contains a detailed listing of the materials in the collection.]

 

Series I. Projects: A-Z, 1901-1971

BoxFolderTitleDate
51Adams Express Building, one volume of b&w construction photos on linen backing bound in cloth by Underhill, 1912 Nov. 21-1913 June 30, 8 x 11.5 in. / 20.2 x 29 cm., 49 p. Includes a complete set of color photocopies from the volume. For item-level description, see attached. 1912-1913
52Bankers Trust Building, one volume of b&w construction photos on linen backing bound in cloth by Underhill, 1910 Oct. 31-1911 June 6, 8 x 11.5 in. / 20.2 x 29 cm., 27 p. Includes eight color photocopies from the volume. For item-level description, see attached. 1910-1911
BoxFolderTitleDate
11Chase Manhattan Bank, 10 b&w photos on 6 sheets in a photo album: one 7.13 x 9.5 in. / 18 x 24 cm. of shop at Pottstown, PA, 1957 Sept.; two 10 x 8.13 in. / 25.3 x 20.6 cm., and seven 8.13 x 10 in. / 20.6 x 253 cm. 1957
12Chase Manhattan Bank, 3 construction photos: two b&w of men lifting steel, tower under construction, n.d., 11 x 8.5 in. / 28 x 21.5 cm. or smaller; and one color of men attaching steel beams, n.d., 13.5 x 11 in. / 35.6 x 28 cm. undated
13Chase Manhattan Bank, advertisement for Bethlehem Steel showing construction of the building (see above), n.d., 11.63 x 8.63 in. / 29.5 x 21.4 cm, 4 p. undated
14Chase Manhattan Bank, reprint of "New York's Old Financial District Gets New Skyscraper," from Architectural Record, 1961 July, pp.141-150, 11.63 x 8.5 in. / 29.5 x 21.5 cm. 1961
BoxFolderTitleDate
61City Investing Building, one volume of b&w construction photos on linen backing, bound in cloth, [19]07 Apr. 15-1907 Dec. 20, 8 x 11.5 in. / 20.2 x 29 cm., 49 p. Includes a complete set of b&w laser copies and 37 color copies from the volume. For item-level description, see attached. 1907
15City Investing Building, Broadway, Cortlandt and Church Streets, includes fold-out drawings of sections and floor plans, and of corridors and entrances, c1907, 12.25 x 9.13 in. / 31.1 x 23.2 cm. Two copies. 1907
16Equitable Life Assurance Society of the United States, home office building in New York. Architects, Skidmore, Owings & Merrill; and contractors, Turner Construction Company. Sixty-seven b&w photographs on 26 sheets in a photo album: two of building model by Ezra Stoller, photographer, 10 x 8 in. / 25.4 x 20.3 cm.; 45 construction photos by Bell Studios, NY, 1959 May 7-1960 Apr. 7, 8 x 9.75 in. / 20.4 x 24.8 cm.; and 20 construction photos with photographer unidentified, 1959 June, 4.88 x 7.5 in. / 12.2 x 19 cm. 1959-1960
17Equitable Life Assurance Society of the United States, home office building in New York. Thirty-one b&w photographs on 16 sheets and ten on linen backing loose in a photo album, 39 construction photos by Bell Studios, N.Y., 1960 Apr. 7-1961 July 3, 10 x 8 in. / 25.3 x 20.3 cm., and one construction photo and one ceremony photo, photographer unidentified, n.d., 8 x 10 in. / 20.3 x 25.3 cm. 1960-1961
18Fifty-four (54) William Street, NYC, 1902, six b&w photos showing girders being delivered by a team of horses, 1902 July 17-[1902] Aug. 28, 7.63 x 9.75 in. / 19.2 x 24.6 cm. on cardboard 10.25 x 13.75 in. / 35.5 x 28 cm. Includes two b&w photocopies. 1902
BoxFolderTitleDate
21-8One Liberty Plaza-two folders of press information on United States Steel Corporation's project on 149-165 Broadway, NYC:
1.) Reports, n.d., 11 x 8.5 in. / 28 x 21.4 cm.: two copies of "Tower Structure," by Matthys P. Levy, Weidlinger/W&P, 3 p.; "Foundations," by Anthony F. Nassetta, Weidlinger/W&P, 3 p.; "Electrical Systems," by Ernest Schmied, Syska & Hennessy, Inc., 3 p.; "Environmental Control," by Paul A. Meuer, Jr., Syska & Hennessy, Inc., 2 p.; "Vertical Transportation," by Anton H. Maurer, Syska & Hennessy, Inc., 2 p.; and one copy of "Structural Research & Development for U.S. Steel Bldg," by A.F. Nassetta, 3 p. with cover sheet
2.) Remarks, n.d., 11 x 8.5 in. / 28 x 21.4 cm.: two copies of "Remarks" by H.S. Turner, President, Turner Construction Company, 3 p.; "Remarks" by Peter B. Ruffin, Galbreath-Ruffin Corporation, 2 p.; "Remarks" by John W. Galbreath, Galbreath-Ruffin Corporation, 3 p.; "Remarks" by R.O. Allen, Partner, Skidmore Owings & Merrill, 9 p. & 7 p.; and "Remarks" by Roger M. Blough, Chairman, United States Steel Corp., 5 p.
3.) Correspondence, 11 x 8.5 in. / 28 x 21.4 cm.: one from J.L. Ortner to A.F. Nassetta, 1968 Mar. 25, 1 p.; and four between A.F. Nassetta & Fortune Magazine, 1970 Dec. 15-1971 June 29, 5 p.;
4.) Press releases, 11 x 8.5 in. / 28 x 21.4 cm.: two copies of U.S. Steel Corporation Press Release, 1968 Apr. 4, (Basic Fact Sheet), 7 p.; and "U.S. Steel's NY Building is Result of Massive Research Program," 1968 Apr. 4, 3 p.; and one copy of "U.S. Steel' s NY Building to Wear Steel Frame on Outside," 1968 Apr. 4, 3 p.; and untitled, 3 p.
5.) 13 press release photos/images from 1968 Apr. 4, 10 x 8 in. / 25.4 x 20.7 cm. containing "A Statement in Steel," "A Panorama of Things to Come," "Towers of Steel," "Sculptured Steel off Broadway," "Building Site Opens up Downtown Area," "Where Have All the Columns Gone?" and "Preview of Building to Come"
6.) Press: "U.S. Steel to Erect a 54-Story Skyscraper," New York Times, 1968 Apr. 5; "U.S. Steel Bldg. Planned by SOM," New York Construction News, 1968 Apr. 8; Advertisement featuring USS Bldg., New York Construction News, 1971 June 21; and "A Lasting Monument Lives for 60 Years," Constructioneer, 1968 June 10
7.) Drawings/Notes, n.d., 11 x 8.5 in. / 28 x 21.4 cm.: three copies of typical floor plan of One Liberty Plaza, Turner Construction; and Wind analysis reports with diagrams, Paul Weidlinger, Consulting Engineers, 8 p.; and 8.) two folders of U.S. Steel Project, n.d., 12.5 x 10 in. / 31.5 x 25.4 cm. with George W. Hess, U.S. Steel Co., business card.
1968-1971
29One Liberty Plaza-photocopies of information on United State Steel Corporation's project on 149-165 Broadway, NYC, 11 x 8.5 in. / 28 x 21.4 cm.:
1.) "Exposed Steel Framing on High Rise Building," n.d., 10 p.
2.) "One Liberty Plaza, New York, N.Y.," n.d., 2 p.
3.) Paragraph description of "One Liberty Plaza, New York, N.Y.," with correspondence from Anthony F. Nassetta to Tom Killian, dated 1972 Aug. 18, 2 p.
1972
210One Liberty Plaza, Rendering photograph signed by Rudolf Assoc[iate]s, NYC, n.d., 13.75 x 11 in. / 35.3 x 28 cm. "Color print by Pennyroyal Productions, 202 East 42nd, NYC Yu 6-6445, Reorder Job. No." stamped on verso in ink. "One Liberty Plaza, U.S. Steel Office B[ui]ld[in]g." annotated in pencil. undated
211Sixty-eight (68) William Street, NYC, 1901, 6 b& w construction photos, Coldwin Starrett. Thompson-Starrett Co., 1901 Nov. 13-1901 Dec. 10, 7.63 x 9.75 in. / 19.2 x 24.6 cm., on cardboard 10.25 x 13.75 in. / 28 x 35.5 cm. 1901
212Union Carbide Corporation Office Building, home office building in New York. Architects, Skidmore, Owings & Merrill; structural Engineers, Weiskopf and Pickworth; mechanical and electrical engineers, Syska and Hennessy; and general contractors, Geroge A. Fuller Co.:
1.) Photocopy of "The Anatomy of a New Project," in Preview: 10, n.d., 4 p. Includes photocopy of a map of train tracks around 47th and 48th Streets and Madison and Park Avenues, n.d., 2 p.
2.) "The Exciting Universe of Union Carbide," n.d., 1 p. Includes b& w photocopy. [item 2 original missing.]
undated

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Series II. Projects: General, 1902-1904, 1954-1956

BoxFolderTitleDate
213William Street[?], NYC, 1902, five b& w construction photos, four of Pennsylvania Building, Thompson-Starrett Co., Builders, 1902 May 1-1904 Jan. 15, 9.75 x 7.63 in. / 24.6 x 19.2 cm. on cardboard 13.5 x 11 in. / 35.5 x 28 cm. and one 13.75 x 10.25 in. / 35 x 26 cm., on cardboard 13.5 x 11 in. / 35.5 x 28 cm. Includes one b&w photocopy. 1902-1904
214Various project photographs organized by type of building. 33 b& w and 1 color, [1954-1956], 13.5 x 10.75 in. / 34.2 x 27.3 cm. or smaller, on 20 sheets in a photo album with one loose page on Commerce Court in downtown Toronto. Five of the images are by Ezra Stoller & Associates. 1954-1956

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Series III. Patents, 1932-1936

BoxFolderTitleDate
215Letters patent, No. 1,851,025 for means for temporarily supporting structural elements, issued 1932 Mar. 29 to Walter H. Weiskopf, 12 x 8 in. / 30.6 x 20.3 cm., [8 p.] 1932
216Letters patent, No. 1,851,026 for means for temporarily supporting structural elements, issued 1932 Mar. 29 to Walter H. Weiskopf, 12 x 8 in. / 30.6 x 20.3 cm., [6 p.] 1932
217Letters patent, No. 1,906,683 for plate girders, issued 1933 May 2 to Weiskopf & Pickworth, 12 x 8 in. / 30.6 x 20.3 cm., [5 p.] 1933
218Letters patent, No. 1,946,049 for plate girders, issued 1934 Feb. 6 to Weiskopf & Pickworth, 12 x 8 in. / 30.6 x 20.3 cm., [4 p.] 1934
219Letters patent, No. 2,058,537 for structural beams, issued 1936 Oct. 27 to Weiskopf & Pickworth, 12 x 8 in. / 30.6 x 20.3 cm., [3 p.] 1936
BoxFolderTitleDate
31Canada, letters patent, No. 342,532 for plate girders, issued 1934 June 26 to Weiskopf & Pickworth, 14.38 x 9 in / 36.7 x 22.8 cm., [16 p.] 1934
32Canada, letters patent, No. 349,832 for plate girders, issued 1935 Apr. 30 to Weiskopf & Pickworth, 14.38 x 9 in / 36.7 x 22.8 cm., [17 p.] 1935
33Canada, letters patent, No. 349,999 for structural beams, issued 1935 May 7 to Weiskopf & Pickworth, 14.38 x 9 in / 36.7 x 22.8 cm., [18p.] 1935
34Two reprints of patent No. 1,906,683 on plate girders, 1933 May 2 11.25 x 7.88 in. / 28.8 x 19.8 cm., [2 p.] 1933
35Photoprint of patent No. 1,906,683 on plate girder, 6p., 1933 May 2, 11.25 x 7 in. / 28.8 x 18.3 cm, 4 p. 1933

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Series IV. Writings, 1931-1969

BoxFolderTitleDate
36Reprint of "T-Flange Girders for Heavy Service," by Weiskopf & Pickworth, Engineering News Record, 1931 Oct. 29, 8.75 x 14 in. / 22.4 x 35.5 cm., 1 p. 1931
37One blueprint on paper of WP girders, 1931 Oct. 29, 23.63x 33.75 in. / 60 x 85.7 cm. 1931
38Original standards: 59 ink on linen, 32 blueprints on paper and linen, 1 pencil on paper, 1 pencil and ink on linen, and 9 blueprints on paper drawings from WP Girders package on beams, columns, 1932, 1944, 1946-1947, 1949-1950, 1954, and 1959-1961, and WP Girders, 1934, 14.75 x 9 in. / 37.5 x 23 cm. 1932-1961
39Standards: blueprints on linen and paper on properties of beams, columns, and WP girders, 1932, 1944, 1946-1947, 1949-1950, 1954, and 1959-1961, 14.75 x 9 in. / 37.5 x 23 cm. or smaller, 42 p. 1932-1961
310Standards: blackline on linen and blueprint on linen on properties of beams, columns, and WP girders, 1932, 1944, 1946-1947, 1949-1950, 1954, and 1959-1961, 14.75 x 9 in. / 37.5 x 23 cm., 58 p. 1932-1961
311Photocopy of standards, 1915, 8.5 x 11 in. / 21.5 x 28 cm., 14 x 8.5 in. / 35.5 x 21.5 cm., and 14.88 x 9.38 in. / 37.7 x 24 cm., 10 p. 1915
312Six copies of WP girders, 1934, 2nd ed., 9 p., a reprint and a photoprint of "A Comparative Analysis of Plate Girders," from Civil Engineering, v. 4, no. 11, 1934 Nov., by Weiskopf & Pickworth, pp.585-589, and three copies of "Comparative Capacities of Various Beams and Girders," n.d, 9 x 14 in. / 22.8 x 35.5 cm. 1934
313A copy of WP Girders, 1934, 9 x 14 in. / 22.8 x 35.5 cm., 9 p.; an annotated reprint of "T-Flange Girders," by William Rice Pearsall, 1932 Sept.; an illustration of girders and formulas; and a copy of the letter from Weiskopf & Pickworth to Virginia Bridge and Iron Co., 1936 Oct. 8. 1934-1936
BoxFolderTitleDate
41Weiskopf & Pickworth's manuscript Rigid Frames and Tapered Members, with 4 loose correspondence from various publishers dated 1935 and 1938, and 3 bulletins of "New York State Society of Professional Engineers." Manuscript includes blueprints on linen; an illustration of girders and formulas; and "Hinges for Footings of Rigid Frame Concrete Bridges," Concrete Information, No. ST 28, 1936 June. 1935-1938
42Three ink on linen drawings of tables of formulas, copies of pages from Chapters 1 through 10 from Rigid Frames manuscript, and two notations, [1936?]. 1936
43Thirty-five ink on linen drawings from Rigid Frames manuscript, showing tapered members and formulas, [1936?]. 1936
44Ten loose blackline prints on paper on properties of beams, columns and WP girders, [1936?], 14.75 x 9 in. / 37.5 x 23 cm. 1936
45Two reprints of "Tapered Structural Members: an Analytical Treatment," by Weiskopf & Pickworth, in American Society of Civil Engineers, Paper No. 1955, c1937, 8.63x 5.88 in. / 21 x 14.8 cm., 74 p. 1955-1937
46Two copies of T-Flange girder examples drawing, 1938, 14 x 17 in. / 35.5 x 43.2 cm. 1938
47Two reprints of "Stresses in Soils Under a Foundation," by Walter H. Weiskopf, in The Journal of the Franklin Institute, v. 239, no. 6, 1945 June, pp. 445-466. 1945
48Reprint of "Steel Framed Tier Buildings in American Design Practice," by John W. Pickworth, International Association for Bridge and Structural Engineering Six Congress, 1960 June-July, pp. 467-478, 9.5 x 6.25 in. / 24.x 17 cm. 1960
49The Transformation of the Morgan Guaranty Trust building, [by Weiskopf & Pickworth, 1960 Nov.], 11 x 8.5 in. / 28 x 21.5 cm., 13 p. 1960
410Fire Tests Prove Steel Structure Can be Exposed, by Anthony F. Nassetta, in Architectural Record, 1969 Sept., v. 146, no. 3. 1969
411Architectural Concrete Materials, by Weiskopf & Pickworth, 1971 Oct. 5, 11 x 8.5 in. / 28 x 21.5 cm., 11 p. 1971

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Series V. Printed Materials, 1932, 1956, 1998

BoxFolderTitleDate
412Five reprints of "T-Flange Girders," by William Rice Pearsall, with illustrations of "girder series," from Pencil Points, 1932 Sept. 11 x 8.5 in. / 28 x 21.5 cm. 1932
413Reprint of "Welded Tapered Girders," by American Institute of Steel Construction, Inc. 1956, 11 x 8.5 in. / 28 x 21.5 cm., 19 p., with a correspondence from T.R. Higgins, American Institute of Steel Construction, Inc. 1956

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Series VI. Framed Photographs and Drawings

BoxFolderTitleDate
41Chase Manhattan Bank Building, color photo on 18 x 15 in. / 45.8 x 38.1 cm. mat board. Very dusty. undated
42Chase Manhattan Bank Building, color photo, (used in Bethlehem advertisement showing several workers on steel beams), on 18.5 x 15.75 in. / 47 x 40 cm. frame. undated
43Empire State Building, b& w photo of construction site, Lewis Hine image, in 18 x 15 in. / 45.8 x 38.1 cm. frame. undated
44Equitable Trust Co. Building, rendering, Trowbridge & Livingston, arch., in 22.63 x 15.13 in. / 56.4 x 38.4 cm. frame. undated
45Gulf Building, Pittsburgh, print of Hugh Ferriss rendering, Trowbridge & Livingston, arch., in 28.13 x 17.75 in. / 71.3 x 43.5 cm. frame. Very dusty and damaged mat board. undated
46J.P. Morgan Building, print of Anton Schutz rendering, on 17.13 x 14 in. / 43.7 x 35.5 cm. on mat board, dusty and borders slightly damaged. undated
47Lever House, night view, b& w photo on 18.5 x 15 in. / 47 x 38.1 cm. mat board. Very dusty. undated
48Lever House, day view, b& w photo on 18.5 x 15 in. / 47 x 38.1 cm. mat board. Water stained and torn along the edges of mat board. undated
49One Liberty Plaza, US Steel Building, color photo, in 17.25 x 14.25 in. / 43.5 x 36.2 cm. frame. undated
410New York Stock Exchange Building, S.C. Weiskopf, construction eng., rendering in 20.63 x 16.13 in. / 51.3 x 41 cm. frame. undated
411Union Carbide Corporation Office Building, color photo, in 17.25 x 14.25 in. / 43.5 x 36.2 cm. frame. undated
412YMCA, Westside branch building, NYC, print of Schell Lewis rendering, on 17.75 x 12.88 in. / 43.5 x 32.8 cm. mat board. Torn edges and very dusty. undated

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Series VI. Adams Express Building (Box 5, Folder 1)

Item-level description of the volume of Adams Express Building construction photographs. "Adams Express Co. Building, 57-59-61 B[road]way" or "Adams Express (Co.) B[ui]ld[in]g, 61 B[road]way" and "Post & McCord, Steel Construction / Builders, N[ew] Y[ork]" printed in the lower corners of the photograph, and "Underhill, 289 Broadway, New York" embossed in the lower corners of the photograph.
BoxFolderTitleDate
51B19268, made 1912 Nov. 21, 7.38 x 9.38 in. / 18.7 x 23.7 cm. 1912
52B19269, Trinity Place thr[o]u[gh] to 57-59-61 B[road]way, made 1912 Nov. 21, 7.38 x 9.38 in. / 18.7 x 23.7 cm. 1912
53B19305, made 1912 Dec. 2, 7.5 x 9.5 in. / 19 x 24 cm. 1912
54B19306, Trinity Pl[ace] thr[o]ugh 57-59-61 B[road]way, made 1912 Dec. 2, 7.38 x 9.5 in. / 18.7 x 24 cm. 1912
55B19347, made 1912 Dec. 12, 7.38 x 9.5 in. / 18.7 x 24 cm. 1912
56B19348, fr[om] Trinity Pl[ace], made 1912 Dec. 12, 7.38 x 9.63 in. / 18.7 x 24.3 cm. 1912
57B19368, made 1912 Dec. 19, 7.5 x 9.5 in. / 19 x 24 cm. 1912
58B19369, Trinity Pl[ace] thr[o]ugh 57-59-61 Broadway, made 1912 Dec. 19, 7.38 x 9.5 in. / 18.7 x 24 cm. 1912
59B19402, made 1913 Jan. 2, 7.5 x 9.38 in. / 19 x 23.7 cm. 1913
510B19403, Trinity Pl[ace] thr[o]u[gh] to 57-59-61 Broadway, made 1913 Jan. 2, 7.5 x 9.5 in. / 19 x 24 cm. 1913
511B19428, made 1913 Jan. 13, 7.5 x 9.5 in. / 19 x 24 cm. 1913
512B19429, from Trinity Place, made 1913 Jan. 13, 7.5 x 9.5 in. / 19 x 24 cm. 1913
513B19475, made 1913 Jan. 23, 7.5 x 9.63 in. / 19 x 24.3 cm. 1913
514B19476, Trinity Place thr[o]u[gh] to 57, 59, 61 B[road]way, made 1913 Jan. 23, 7.5 x 9.5 in. / 19 x 24 cm. 1913
515B19500, made 1913 Feb. 4, 7.38 x 9.38 in. / 18.7 x 23.7 cm. 1913
516B19501, from Trinity Place, made 1913 Feb. 4, 7.38 x 9.5 in. / 18.7 x 24 cm. 1913
517B19510, made 1913 Feb. 14, 9.5 x 7.38 in. / 24 x 18.7 cm. 1913
518B19516, from Trinity Place, made 1913 Feb. 15, 9.38 x 7.38 in. / 23.7 x 18.7 cm. 1913
519B19523, made 1913 Feb. 24, 9.5 x 7.38 in. / 24 x 18.7 cm. 1913
520B19524, from Trinity Pl[ace], made 1913 Feb. 24, 9.63 x 7.5 in. / 24.3 x 19 cm. 1913
521B19566, made 1913 Mar. 6, 9.63 x 7.5 in. / 24.3 x 19 cm. 1913
522B19567, from Trinity Pl[ace], made 1913 Mar. 6, 9.5 x 7.5 in. / 24 x 19 cm. 1913
523B19602, made 1913 Mar. 18, 9.38 x 7.38 in. / 23.7 x 18.7 cm. 1913
524B19603, made 1913 Mar. 18, 9.38 x 7.5 in. / 23.7 x 19 cm. 1913
525B19637, made 1913 Mar. 28, 9.5 x 7.5 in. / 24 x 19 cm. 1913
526B19638, Trinity Pl[ace] to 61 B[road]way, made 1913 Mar. 28, 9.5 x 7.5 in. / 24 x 19 cm. 1913
527B19682, made 1913 Apr. 7, 9.5 x 7.38 in. / 24 x 18.7 cm. 1913
528B19683, from Trinity Pl[ace], made 1913 Apr. 7, 9.38 x 7.38 in. / 23.7 x 18.7 cm. 1913
529B19700, made 1913 Apr. 14, 9.5 x 7.38 in. / 24 x 18.7 cm. 1913
530B19701, made 1913 Apr. 14, 9.38 x 7.38 in. / 23.7 x 18.7 cm. 1913
531B19702, made 1913 Apr. 14, 9.38 x 7.38 in. / 23.7 x 18.7 cm. 1913
532B19731, made 1913 Apr. 17, 9.5 x 7.5 in. / 24 x 19 cm. 1913
533B19732, from Trinity Pl[ace], made 1913 Apr. 17, 9.63 x 7.5 in. / 24.3 x 19 cm. 1913
534B19773, made 1913 Apr. 29, 9.5 x 7.5 in. / 24 x 19 cm. 1913
535B19774, from Trinity Pl[ace], made 1913 Apr. 29, 9.25 x 7.38 in. / 23.2 x 18.7 cm. 1913
536B19836, made 1913 May 3, 9.5 x 7.38 in. / 24 x 18.7 cm. 1913
537B19837, from Trinity Pl[ace], made 1913 May 9, 9.5 x 7.38I n. / 24 x 18.7 cm. 1913
538B19861, made 1913 May 19, 9.63 x 7.5 in. / 24.3 x 19 cm. 1913
539B19862, from Trinity Pl[ace], made 1913 May 19, 9.5 x 7.5 in. / 24 x 19 cm. 1913
540B19883, made 1913 May 26, 7.5 x 9.5 in. / 19 x 24 cm. 1913
541B19884, made 1913 May 26, 9.5 x 7.38 in. / 24 x 18.7 cm. 1913
542B19897, made 1913 May 29, 9.63 x 7.5 in. / 24.3 x 19 cm. 1913
543B19898, from Trinity Pl[ace], made 1913 May 29, 9.5 x 7.38 in. / 24 x 18.7 cm. 1913
544B19944, made 1913 June 9, 9.5 x 7.5 in. / 24 x 19 cm. 1913
545B19945, from Trinity Place, made 1913 June 9, 9.5 x 7.5 in. / 19 x 24 cm. 1913
546B20001, made 1913 June 19, 9.38 x 7.5 in. / 23.7 x 19 cm. 1913
547B20002, from Trinity Pl[ace], made 1913 June 19, 9.5 x 7.38 in. / 24 x 18.7 cm. 1913
548B20024, made 1913 June 30, 9.5 x 7.38 in. / 24 x 18.7 cm. 1913
549B20025, from Trinity Pl[ace], made 1913 June 30, 9.5 x 7.38 in. / 24 x 18.7 cm. 1913

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Series VI. Bankers Trust Building (Box 5, Folder 2)

Item-level description of the volume of Bankers Trust Building construction photographs. "Bankers Trust Co., Wall & Nassau St[reet]s" and "Post & McCord, Steel Builders, New York" printed in the lower corners of the photograph and "Underhill, 289 Broadway, New York" embossed in the lower corners of the photograph. Photograph captions (in square ([])* brackets) by structural engineer Derek Trelstad.
BoxFolderTitleDate
51B16935, made 1910 Oct. 31, 7.5 x 9.5 in. / 19 x 24 cm. 1910
[Temporary bracing at Wall Street. The stiff-legged derricks at the sidewalk and along the west lot line were probably used to remove spoil from the excavation.]
52B16936, made 1910 Oct. 31, 7.5 x 9.5 in. / 19 x 24 cm. 1910
[The gentleman in the jacket and bow tie at the bottom of the photograph, probably a site superintendent for steel erectors Post & McCord, looks on as the mast of a stiff legged derrick is placed. The lower end of the mast will be placed on the cast-iron plate bolted to the timbers to the left in the photo. The leg of the derrick rests on the temporary shoring and provides a temporary platform for the superintendent to observe the work.]
53B16987, made 1910 Nov. 15, 7.5 x 9.5 in. / 19 x 24 cm. 1910
[The first steel columns appear among the mazes of temporary timber shoring. The steel fabricator's main stiff-legged derrick has been erected on the new steel columns. Smaller derricks are visible below; they were probably used to remove materials such as the temporary shoring from the excavation.]
54B17044, made 1910 Nov. 30, 7.5 x 9.5 in. / 19 x 24 cm. 1910
[The first tier of steel columns nears completion.]
55B17083, made 1910 Dec. 16, 9.5 x 7.5 in. / 24 x 19 cm. 1910
[The steel frame has been raised to the ground floor level and planked to provide a temporary work platform. The main erection derrick has been placed so that steel members arriving by truck or cart can be picked from both Wall and Nassau Streets. The platform over Nassau Street has been removed. Materials are stored in the street and over what appears to be a sidewalk vault east of the new building.]
56B17100, made 1910 Dec. 27, 9.5 x 7.5 in. / 24 x 19 cm. 1910
[Bystanders watch as a column is set along the Wall Street elevation. The derrick holds the third column from the east while mechanics align the pre-drilled holes for the rivets. The two man crew just behind the hoarding at the left edge of the photo may be the forgeman and his helper preparing rivets. It is also likely that the column is being placed and held in place temporarily with bolts or pins and that the two man crew is excavating for the sidewalk vault under Wall Street.]
57B17115, made 1911 Jan. 6, 9.5 x 7.5 in. / 24 x 19 cm. 1911
[The second tier of steel columns have been placed, completing the second floor, just below the two-story main banking room. A small derrick has been erected to facilitate movement of materials, including the boom of the stiff-legged derrick. The steel has reached a level that requires resetting the main erection derrick.]
58B17139, made 1911 Jan. 16, 9.5 x 7.5 in. / 24 x 19 cm. 1911
[A week after the previous photo (B17139) the derrick has been reset and the third tier of columns has been erected. Temporary protective staging is being constructed along Nassau and Wall Streets to protect passersby and to provide a temporary work platform. Steel to be placed has been piled on the planked second floor deck and over the Wall Street sidewalk vault. The built-up sections at street level (Wall Street elevation) will be secured to the shear tabs-steel plates secured to the sides of the columns-that are visible on most columns.]
59B17171, made 1911 Jan. 28, 9.5 x 7.5 in. / 24 x 19 cm. 1911
[The floor above the Main Banking Room is supported at the perimeter of the building on deep girders, which appear to bear on secondary columns just inside the main columns (compare this photo with the image captured on January 16 [B17139]). The steel arrived from the fabricator with a coat of red lead or iron oxide paint. Once it is set in place it is coated with a waterproofing paint-likely an asphalt-based compound-that provides a measure of protection against corrosion after the masonry has been set.]
510B17180, made 1911 Feb. 1, 7.5 x 9.5 in. / 19 x 24 cm. 1911
[At the right side of the photo a mechanic kneels over a bucket. Loose cold rivets lie nearby, suggesting that this photo was taken early in the morning before the forgeman had set up his fire. It is also possible that the forgeman may have been on a lower level and the mechanic visible here is the riveter's assistant; a fuzzy second figure-the riveter-appears to be clinging to the far side of the column behind the kneeling mechanic. In the foreground, a girder is being placed. The fuzzy figure just to the left of the column (left center of photo) is an ironworker guiding the girder in place. The wind bracing system for the building is visible in the heavy diagonal members, as are the fabricators markings on the gusset plate just to the right of the derrick.]
511B17214, made 1911 Feb. 11, 9.5 x 7.5 in. / 24 x 19 cm. 1911
[Steel erection continues.]
512B17230, made 1911 Feb. 21, 9.5 x 7.5 in. / 24 x 19 cm. 1911
[Stone packed in wood crates has arrived on site. Unopened crates have been placed on the protective staging near where they will be installed on the building. Stone, like terra cotta used on less monumental structures, was fabricated to fit in a specific location on the fa硤e. The dimensions of each piece were scaled from the architect's drawings by the stone fabricator during earlier phases of construction, long before any of the steel was placed. Using both the architect's drawings and actual field measurements, the fabricator developed drawings showing the full building, keyed to smaller drawings depicting each stone and its dimensions. These drawings were reviewed by the architect and, when necessary, the engineer. Corrections to the design of the stone work and the connection detail between the stone and the steel frame, as well as the dimensions of each unit were made on paper before a chisel touched stone. The process of reviewing and revising these shop drawings often took many weeks.]
513B17231, made 1911 Feb. 21, 7.5 x 9.5 in. / 19 x 24 cm. 1911
[As the steel frame progressed upward, masons followed on the exterior with the stone cladding. At the interior a second crew of carpenters and masons constructed the floor structure. While the floor structure is not visible in any of the photos in this series, there are several clues in this image that suggest the floor system is a flat hollow tile arch. At the upper floor in the photo, pairs of holes are visible just above the middle of the web of each beam. Tie rods will be threaded through these holes-as they have been at the lower floor-prior to the placement terra cotta blocks that comprise the tile arch. The tie rods countered the thrust of the flat arch against the steel floor beams. At the lower floor, hangers secured to the top flange of the beams support timber "centering." The tile blocks of the flat arch-"skews" at the beams, "keystones" at the center, and "inters" between-will be placed on the temporary timber centering. When the keystone or central block has been placed and the mortar allowed to cure the centering and hangers are removed. Suspending the centering from the beams minimized the need to provide extensive temporary shoring bearing on the lower floor-reducing costs and expediting construction.]
514B17232, made 1911 Feb. 21, 7.5 x 9.5 in. / 19 x 24 cm. 1911
[See caption for previous photo (B17231).]
515B17274, made 1911 Mar. 3, 9.5 x 7.5 in. / 24 x 19 cm. 1911
[The stiff legged derricks at the sixth floor level of the steel frame have been placed to allow the masons to lift the heavy stones that make up the exterior cladding.]
516B17303, made 1911 Mar. 13, 9.5 x 7.5 in. / 24 x 19 cm. 1911
[The speed with which a steel frame could be erected is graphically revealed when this photo is compared with that taken on March 3, 1911 (B17274). In the course of approximately five working days the steel fabricator has almost completed erection of another tier of two-story columns. The masons, working the same hours, have completed placing the stone on approximately one-half story. While the stone work at the lower levels of this building is rather intricate, progress on a simpler masonry fa硤e would not have been as great as that made by the steel fabricator. In fact, the direct comparison of the speed of masonry and steel construction needs also to account for the work underway at the interior of the structure-placement of floor systems, construction of demising partitions and roughing-in plumbing and other utilities. In a masonry bearing wall building, the floors of the upper stories cannot be placed until the masonry reaches the level of the upper stories-and a sufficient time must be provided to allow the mortar in the masonry to set.]
517B17356, made 1911 Mar. 25, 9.5 x 7.5 in. / 24 x 19 cm. 1911
[While the steel frame skyscraper dramatically changed the skylines of cities like New York and Chicago with forms achievable only with the new technology of steel frames, the technology of assembling and filling the frames remained comparatively archaic. Riveting required teams of three to four men-a forgeman, a riveter, and one or two helpers. Rivets were heated in a forge to a red heat. The hot rivet was tossed by the forgeman or his helper to the riveter or his helper and placed in a hole. The helper then placed a dolly on the head of the rivet while the riveter manually hammered a second head on the narrow end of the rivet. By the late 1920s that process had become automated to some extent. The manual hammering of rivets was ultimately replaced after the introduction of pneumatic riveting hammers.]
518B17378, made 1911 Apr. 4, 9.5 x 7.5 in. / 24 x 19 cm. 1911
[To the left of the nearly completed steel frame stands the steeple of Trinity Church; and to the right beyond the Hanover National Bank, the domed top of the Singer Building is visible. Both buildings were at one time the tallest in New York City.]
519B17418, made 1911 Apr. 15, 9.5 x 7.5 in. / 24 x 19 cm. 1911
[At the main shaft of the tower the masons made more rapid progress than at the lower stories, which had more intricate masonry finishes. In the past nine working days the masons-whose suspended rigs are visible just below the mid-point of the tower shaft-have completed approximately one story every two days.]
520B17443, made 1911 Apr. 25, 9.5 x 7.5 in. / 24 x 19 cm. 1911
[See caption for previous photo (B17418).]
521B17465, made 1911 May 3, 7.5 x 9.5 in. / 19 x 24 cm. 1911
[Topping out-the ritual of placing a pine bough on the uppermost member of a recently completed structure-is usually an occasion for a photograph and a bit of festivity. The steel frame is has not been completed in this photo, but the ironworkers posed for the photographer hired by the contractor or owner to document construction.]
522B17466, made 1911 May 3, 7.5 x 9.5 in. / 19 x 24 cm. 1911
[This crew of mechanics have rigged the upper portion of the steel frame for placement of the next beam. Hard hats and safety harnesses-a regular part of any ironworkers kit today-were virtually unknown at the turn of the twentieth century.]
523B17469, made 1911 May 5, 9.5 x 7.5 in. / 24 x 19 cm. 1911
[Erection of the steel continues.]
524B17470, made 1911 May 5, 7.5 x 9.5 in. / 19 x 24 cm. 1911
[Just below the pyramidal roof, the steel frame steps back and out again to form a "porch." The long slender columns visible in this photo define the columns of the porch.]
525B17502, made 1911 May 15, 9.5 x 7.5 in. / 24 x 19 cm. 1911
[Erection of the steel continues.]
526B17529, made 1911 May 25, 9.5 x 7.5 in. / 24 x 19 cm. 1911
[Erection of the steel continues.]
527B17559, made 1911 Jun. 6, 9.5 x 7.5 in. / 24 x 19 cm. 1911
[The stepped masonry pyramidal roof is-like the rest of the building-a steel frame clad with stone.]

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Series VI. City Investing Building (Box 6, Folder 1)

Item-level description of the volume of City Investing Building construction photographs. "City Investing Building" and "Post & McCord, N[ew] Y[ork]" printed in the lower corners of the photograph.
BoxFolderTitleDate
61B11568, 1907 Apr. 15, 9.63 x 7.5 in. / 24 x 19 cm. 1907
62B11629, 1907 Apr. 30, 7.5 x 9.63 in. / 19 x 24.3 cm. 1907
63B11651, 1907 May 7, 7.5 x 9.63 in. / 19 x 24.3 cm. 1907
64B11673, 1907 May 14, 7.5 x 9.5 in. / 19 x 24 cm. 1907
65B11695, 1907 May 21, 7.5 x 9.5 in. / 19 x 24 cm. 1907
66B11696, 1907 May 21, 9.63 x 7.5 in. / 24.3 x 19 cm. 1907
67B11739, made 1907 May 28, 7.5 x 9.63 in. / 19 x 24.3 cm. 1907
68B11772, made 1907 June 4, 7.5 x 9.63 in. / 19 x 24.3 cm. 1907
69B11785, made 1907 June 11, 9.5 x 7.5 in. / 24 x 19 cm. 1907
610B11786, made 1907 June 11, 7.5 x 9.63 in. / 19 x 24.3 cm. 1907
611B11795, made 1907 June 18, 9.5 x 7.5 in. / 24 x 19 cm. 1907
612B11796, made 1907 June 18, 9.5 x 7.5 in. / 24 x 19 cm. 1907
613B11812, made 1907 June 25, 9.5 x 7.5 in. / 19 x 24 cm. 1907
614B11821, made 1907 July 2, 9.5 x 7.5 in. / 24 x 19 cm. 1907
615B11822, made 1907 July 2, 9.38 x 7.5 in. / 23.7 x 19 cm. 1907
616B11832, made 1907 July 9, 9.5 x 7.5 in. / 24 x 19 cm. 1907
617B11873, made 1907 July 16, 9.63 x 7.5 in. / 24.3 x 19 cm. 1907
618B11902, made 1907 July 23, 9.63 x 7.5 in. / 24.3 x 19 cm. 1907
619B11903, made 1907 July 23, 9 x 7.5 in. / 22.7 x 19 cm. 1907
620B11914, made 1907 July 30, 9.63 x 7.5 in. / 24.3 x 19 cm. 1907
621B11915, made 1907 July 30, 9.38 x 7.5 in. / 23.7 x 19 cm. 1907
622B11953, made 1907 Aug. 6, 9.5 x 7.5 in. / 24 x 19 cm. 1907
623B11954, made 1907 Aug. 6, 9.5 x 7.5 in. / 24 x 19 cm. 1907
624B11993, made 1907 Aug. 13, 8.75 x 7.5 in. / 22.2 x 19 cm. 1907
625B11994, made 1907 Aug. 13, 9.63 x 7.5 in. / 24.3 x 19 cm. 1907
626B12009, made 1907 Aug. 20, 9.5 x 7.5 in. / 24 x 19 cm. 1907
627B12013, made 1907 Aug. 21, 9.63 x 7.5 in. / 24.3 x 19 cm. 1907
628B12029, made 1907 Aug. 27, 9.5 x 7.5 in. / 24 x 19 cm. 1907
629B12030, made 1907 Aug. 27, 9.5 x 7.5 in. / 24 x 19 cm. 1907
630B12062, made 1907 Sept. 4, 9.63 x 7.5 in. / 24.3 x 19 cm. 1907
631B12063, made 1907 Sept. 5, 9.5 x 7.5 in. / 24 x 19 cm. 1907
632B12076, made 1907 Sept. 12, 9.5 x 7.5 in. / 24 x 19 cm. 1907
633B12077, made 1907 Sept. 12, 9.63 x 7.5 in. / 24.3 x 19 cm. 1907
634B12099, made 1907 Sept. 19, 9.5 x 7.5 in. / 24 x 19 cm. 1907
635B12100, made 1907 Sept. 19, 9.5 x 7.38 in. / 24 x 18.7 cm. 1907
636B12127, made 1907 Sept. 26, 9.63 x 7.5 in. / 24.3 x 19 cm. 1907
637B12128, made 1907 Sept. 26, 9.5 x 7.5 in. / 24 x 19 cm. 1907
638B12185, made 1907 Oct. 10, 9.5 x 7.5 in. / 24 x 19 cm. 1907
639B12186, made 1907 Oct. 10, 9.5 x 7.5 in. / 24 x 19 cm. 1907
640B12227, made 1907 Oct. 24, 9.5 x 7.5 in. / 24 x 19 cm. 1907
641B12228, made 1907 Oct. 24, 9.5 x 7.5 in. / 24 x 19 cm. 1907
642B12276, made 1907 Nov. 7, 9.38 x 7.5 in. / 23.7 x 19 cm. 1907
643B12277, made 1907 Nov. 7, 9.5 x 7.5 in. / 24 x 19 cm. 1907
644B12323, made 1907 Nov. 22, 9.5 x 7.5 in. / 24 x 19 cm. 1907
645B12324, made 1907 Nov. 22, 9 x 7.5 in. / 22.7 x 19 cm. 1907
646B12348, made 1907 Dec. 5, 9.5 x 7.5 in. / 24 x 19 cm. 1907
647B12349, made 1907 Dec. 5, 9.25 x 7.5 in. / 23.2 x 19 cm. 1907
648B12387, made 1907 Dec. 20, 9.38 x 7.5 in. / 23.7 x 19 cm. 1907
649B12388, made 1907 Dec. 20, 9.5 x 7.5 in. / 24 x 19 cm. 1907

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